Help and frequently asked questions

What is the treatment for benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV)?

Answer: 

Your specialist may perform a procedure known as the Epley manoeuvre. This often works if you have fragments of debris (otoconia) at the bottom of your posterior semicircular canal (the common situation). This is done by a series of four movements of the head. After each movement, the head is held in the same place for 30 seconds or so.

The movements of the head basically cause the posterior semicircular canal to rotate around in such a way that gravity moves the otoconia fragments out from the posterior canal and into the vestibule where they then settle and cause no symptoms.

If the Epley manoeuvre does not work, your specialist may recommend you do a series of head movements known as the Brandt-Daroff exercises. These exercises involve a different way of moving the head compared to the Epley manoeuvre but with the same objective of moving the otoconia fragments out from the posterior canal and into the vestibule where they then settle and cause no symptoms.

If the Epley manoeuvre or Brandt-Daroff exercises are not successful, or not done, you can remain optimistic. BPPV is a condition that usually goes away on its own after several weeks or months without any treatment. One study said the condition had resolved in many people with BPPV in an average of 10 weeks. The otoconia are thought either to dissolve or move to a place in the labyrinth where they cause no symptoms.

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